INPATH-TES has developed the following courses in an on-line platform. The courses run continuously, and any student/researcher can use them. Members from the INPATH-TES network have free access to the courses, but external researchers need to pay a fee for each ECTS taken.

See full list of courses below, click on course links for more information:

Course Details:

The main objective of this course is to introduce the students to the basic aspects related to the scientific method, and provides the students with the details on the concepts of research, development and innovation (R&D&I). Specifically, the course provides an introduction to the different research methods and exposes the differences between the definition of PhD and industrial PhD. Concepts such as Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), management of the research data, and the Intellectual Property Rights (IRP) are also dealt with in detail. The students also have the opportunity to learn how to correctly write a CV (academic and industrial one) and supporting statements.

Topics:

  1. Definition of Research, Development and Innovation (R+D+I)
    • T1 L1 – Research and innovation: modes of knowledge production. Definition of PhD and Industrial PhD. Worldwide, European, and National statistics
    • T1 L2 – Types of CV and supporting statements
  2. Research methods
    • T2 L1 – The research process and the research method
    • T2 L2 – Error analysis of measurements and in simulations
  3. Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI)
    • T3 L1 – Definition of RRI; RRI plan; Key elements: engagement; gender equality; science education; open access; ethics; governance; sustainability; social justice/inclusion
    • T3 L2 – Management of research data
    • T3 L3* – Management of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)
    • T3 L4 – Social Acceptance

Course Details:

The course will introduce students to thermal energy storage (TES), from thermophysical properties of materials used in TES systems to their implementation into the energy system. Thus, it will introduce the energy system and policy drivers, describing the technologies that can be used for storing energy, and focusing on fundamentals of thermal energy storage, its technologies, and its role in the energy system, while providing details on thermodynamic properties of materials. The learning philosophy of this course is to provide students enough information in order, for them, to be able to analyse a problem related to thermal energy storage and have a first idea on how to solve it by TES.

Topics:

  1. The energy system and policy drivers
    • T1 L1 – World and European key energy data
    • T1 L2* – Renewable energy policies
  2. Introduction to energy storage and to thermal energy storage
    • T2 L1* – Role of energy storage and thermal energy storage
    • T2 L2 – Types of energy storage
    • T2 L3 – Potential and criteria for TES
  3. TES technologies
    • T3 L1 – Sensible heat storage
    • T3 L2 – Latent heat storage
    • T3 L3 – Sorption and chemical heat storage
  4. Role of TES in the energy system
    • T4 L1* – Role of energy storage and thermal energy storage
    • T4 L2 – Rational use of energy by means of TES

Course Details:

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of thermal energy storage materials and their properties. It will also introduce a selection methodology as a tool for selecting TES materials performing the best for a certain application. Numerical models will be introduced for design and calculation of composite structures including TES materials, in order to perform an optimal selection regarding energy efficiency. Numerical models at micro/nano-scale for TES materials can provide better understanding of the heat and mass transfer phenomena on small scales. This knowledge can be applied to the design of new energy storage materials. A continuous learning philosophy is adopted in this course, with emphasis on problem solving through application of thermal engineering fundamentals - energy balances and thermodynamics. This course will be linked to other courses such as building or industrial applications.

Topics:

  1. Introduction to TES materials
    • T1 L1 – Fundamentals of materials science and engineering
    • T1 L2 – Materials for TES and relevant properties
    • T1 L3 – Corrosion issues related to the use of TES materials
  2. Selection of TES materials for different applications
    • T2 L1* – Introduction to materials selection methodology and case studies
  3. Development of TES composites for different applications
    • T3 L1 – Introduction to TES composite materials processing and case studies
    • T3 L2 – Calculation of thermal properties of composite materials and case studies
    • T3 L3 – Introduction to modelling of thermal energy storage composites in different applications and case studies
  4. Micro & nano-scale modelling of TES materials
    • T4 L1 – Introduction to micro & nano-scale modelling and kinetic theory
    • T4 L2 – Molecular Dynamics (MD)
    • T4 L3 – Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), Lattice Boltzmann and Coupling MD+ DSMC
    • T4 L4 – Micro & nano-scale modelling on TES materials

Course Details:

The course focuses on the characterization of energy storage materials and on the methods that could be used for testing them. It will provide the theoretical background and standard of characterization, describing also the instrumentation and the parameters that have to be measured. Thermal and structural characterization technologies have been subdivided in conventional and “in house”. Such technologies are the objects of the lessons of the course with the aim to offer a complete overview on: Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC); Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA); T-history methodology and stability analysis for heterogeneous materials; technologies for measuring morphological, structural and specific solid properties, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, rheological properties, volatility and vapour pressure. Lab scale, experimental and in-situ procedures for thermal response, compatibility, flammability and mechanical testing will be given also.

Topics:

  1. Relevant properties for TES applications
    • T1 L1 – Approach and Planning for Testing Properties
  2. Methods of characterisation and testing for thermophysical properties
    • T2 L1 – Thermophysical properties: DSC, TGA, T-history and other home-made techniques (including in-situ measurement)
    • T2 L2 – Technologies for measuring thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion: commercial and other home-made techniques
  3. Process-related properties characterisation
    • T3 L1 – Physical properties
    • T3 L2 – Chemical properties

Course Details:

Course 5 serves to provide the INPATH-TES students with basic and advanced knowledge in heat transfer. It addresses such topics as multi-dimensional heat transfer, mass transfer, heat transfer with phase change, thermal design and component modelling. It is envisioned that since the PhD programme allows enrolling students with very different background, their entrance level knowledge in heat transfer may significantly vary. For this reason, the learning material includes such very basic items as fundamental heat transfer modes, thermal properties of materials, and heat transfer enhancement. On the other hand, students with an appropriate background would proceed directly to the lessons on basic numerical methods for thermal problems, analysis and modelling of heat transfer with phase change, and study of specific effects related to heat transfer in phase-change materials. Mass transfer by diffusion and convection is included as the theoretical basis for thermochemical energy storage. An advanced student will also acquire broad knowledge and practical tools in principles of thermal design, modelling and optimization of heat transfer equipment in general and sensible, latent and thermochemical energy storage devices, in particular.

Topics:

  1. Multi-dimensional heat transfer: basic modes and analysis
    • T1 L1 – Heat transfer fundamentals
    • T1 L2 – Theoretical and numerical analysis of multi-dimensional heat transfer
  2. Mass transfer: basic modes and analysis
    • T2 L1 – Mass transfer fundamentals
    • T2 L2 – Advanced mass transfer
  3. Heat transfer with phase change: theoretical background and methods of solution
    • T3 L1 – Heat transfer with phase change: analytical and numerical modelling
    • T3 L2 – Modelling of thermochemical storage
  4. Design and optimization of thermal energy storage and component modelling
    • T4 L1 – Design, modelling and optimization of thermal components
    • T4 L2 – Design and optimization of TES components and systems

Course Details:

The purpose of this course is to provide the students enrolled in the INPATH-TES PhD programme with all fundamental aspects of Intellectual Property (IP) in general, and of patents in particular. The first part of the course is designed to provide an overview of IP and the reasons why it is considered an important economic and cultural asset in today’s life and economy. Another important subject of the first part of the course is devoted to the definition of the dissemination, exploitation and communication plan. The second part of the course focuses on some basics concepts regarding patents, such as the relevant parts of the patent system and how to make use of patent information to encourage innovation and economic growth, patent classification, and the main tools available for patent information search. Besides this, the course also explains the different ways to apply for a patent, and presents some relevant case studies for a better understanding of the theoretical information presented.

Topics:

  1. Intellectual property management
    • T1 L1* – Intellectual Property and Intellectual Property Rights
    • T1 L2* – Dissemination, exploitation and communication plan
  2. Patents
    • T2 L1 – Basics of patents and classification systems
    • T2 L2 – Applying for a patent and case studies

Course Details:

The objective of the course is to provide the methodology required to develop a product starting from the preliminary idea. The structure of the course starts with an introduction (with the need for innovation), then it describes the idea generation, idea screening, idea development and testing, followed by the business analysis, finishing with the technical implementation of a new idea.

Topics:

  1. Idea to product
    • T1 L1 – Idea generation methods (InnoEnergy)
    • T1 L2 – Idea screening
    • T1 L3 – Idea development and testing
    • T1 L4 – Technical implementation
  2. Business analysis
    • T2 L1* – Business analysis tools. Listening Analysis. Lifecycle Management

Course Details:

The course ‘Dissemination of research results’ is developed to help students evaluate their research and develop appropriate dissemination plans to ensure the research makes an impact and gains recognition in the respective field. The course explains the meaning and purpose of dissemination for the communication of research. The primary method by which research is disseminated is through publication at both a conference level and in academic journals. The course highlights the importance of publishing and the skill set required to do so. In addition to this, other methods to communicate research that our available to the non-scientific community such as radio, TV, newsprint and the ‘new media’ social media, will be covered. As information such as citations and publications can be readily available on social media, it is important that PhD students are given the opportunity to learn skills required to disseminate their research in an effective manner, as taught through this course. The skills required to complete an academic paper will be communicated with students via a presentation, recommended reading materials and assessment of knowledge gained will be undertaken.

Topics:

  1. What does ‘dissemination’ mean? What does it mean to publish as an academic?
    • T1 L1* – Dissemination, exploitation and communication plan
  2. Publication of research results
    • T2 L1 – Publication in scientific journals
    • T2 L2 – Participation in scientific conferences
  3. Non-scientific publications and the Communication Plan
    • T3 L1* – Dissemination, exploitation and communication plan
    • T3 L2 – Traditional Media coverage. Community dissemination and new media. Report Writing

Course Details:

This course aims at providing the students sufficient skills and information needed to locate and successfully apply for suitable sources of research funding, and to introduce them to the basics of project management, dissemination, exploitation and communication. Specifically, the course presents the different types of funding available and where these sources of funding can be found, how networking can help in locating funding, how to prepare and write a proposal, and how proposals are evaluated. Furthermore, the course also presents the different stages of the lifecycle of a project and explains the main skills required in managing a project. Finally, the purpose and definition of the research dissemination, exploitation and communication plan are also provided.

Topics:

  1. Searching for funding, preparation and submission of project proposals
    • T1 L1 – Types of funding. Proposal writing and submission. Evaluation of project proposals
    • T1 L2* – Networking and influencing the policy-makers
  2. Project management
    • T2 L1 – Project lifecycle. Project follow-up and justification. General project management skills
  3. Dissemination, exploitation and communication
    • T3 L1 – Dissemination, exploitation and communication plan

Course Details:

This course provides an introduction to Management and Entrepreneurship for course participants with a technical background. The topics covered in this course are prototype to market roadmap (business ideas), business planning (innovation concept), entrepreneurship (start-up company), managing firms for growth, and building soft skills in management and entrepreneurship. By the end of this course, participants will be able to generate business ideas, assess opportunities, formulate business strategies, find their first customers, procure funding for startups and manage firms for growth. Soft skills such as teamwork, leadership and communication for management and entrepreneurship are covered as well.

Topics:

  1. Prototype to market roadmap: business ideas
    • T1 L1 – Idea generation methods (Innoenergy)
    • T1 L2 – Find your customer (Innoenergy)
  2. Business planning: innovation concept
    • T2 L1 – Opportunity assessment (Innoenergy)
    • T2 L2 – Business planning foundations
  3. Entrepreneurship
    • T3 L1 – Legal forms of companies
    • T3 L2 – Funding your start-up
    • T3 L3 – Scaling your start-up
    • T3 L4 – Building soft skills in management and entrepreneurship

Course Details:

In this course, the main building integration strategies of TES systems as passive and active solution for energy saving and indoor thermal comfort conditions are introduced and discussed. The key evaluation methodologies, e.g. experimental assessment and modelling-simulation approach, are also presented and deeply analysed. Then, the most significant research contributions are described and the uttermost promising future trends are outlined. Finally, the student is driven to select the proper TES solution with varying the main constraint of several research problems and also the district scale application is discussed, in cooperation with other two courses of the same PhD programme (Course 13 and Course 12).

Topics:

  1. Thermal energy storage applications in building
    • T1 L1 – Thermal comfort, energy consumption and the role of TES systems in buildings
    • T1 L2 – Selection of TES for given boundary conditions in buildings
    • T1 L3 – Integration of PCMs into building envelopes and thermo-physical considerations (passive)
    • T1 L4 – TES systems for heating and cooling in buildings’ applications (active)
    • T1 L5* – Overview of thermal energy storage systems for district heating and cooling
  2. Recent research progress and promising scientific directions
    • T1 L1 – Recent research contributions and main numerical and experimental findings - TES systems integrated in buildings. Case studies.
  3. Experimental in-situ and field performance of TES in buildings
    • T3 L1 – Real scale performance of TES in buildings. Indoor and outdoor boundary conditions. (Case studies)
  4. Simulation of TES in building applications
    • T4 L1 – Application of numerical simulation tools to analyze thermal energy storage systems in building applications
  5. Thermal energy storage applications in buildings: environmental and economic aspects
    • T5 L1* – Introduction to LCA, LCC, cost-base analysis and carbon footprint: methodology, boundary selection, input data. Outputs of a LCA and LCC analysis, environmental and economic interpretation
    • T5 L2 – Life cycle tools and application to thermal energy storage systems in buildings. Case studies

Course Details:

Demand side management (DSM) is based on two essential features, namely energy efficiency and of increasing importance, the role of demand side response. Energy efficiency is essential if we are to deliver zero carbon and low energy solutions for society. Changes to human behaviour and control systems are increasingly proving to be critical if energy savings, as a result of technological development, can be maximised. Often technology improvements are let down by the human involvement and hence it is important that those involved with research into the development and implementation of technologies understand demand side management. Demand side response addresses variable electricity and heat load management, whether driven by variable renewable energy or batch/cyclic demand and supplies. The course will cover the subject at macro – city level, down to buildings. It will outline legislative and incentive programmes, discuss the financial aspects and conclude with case studies of DSM.

Topics:

  1. Introduction, DSM implementation and strategies
    • T1 L1 – Introduction, DSM implementation and strategies. Case studies
    • T1 L2* – Overview of thermal energy storage systems for district heating and cooling
  2. Solutions for DSM - renewable energy, energy storage, energy efficiency, city district and smart grid
    • T2 L1 – Solutions for DSM. Appropriateness of DSM given regional context
  3. Legislation and incentive programmes for DSM
    • T3 L1* – Renewable energy policies
    • T3 L2 – Appliance Energy Standards and labeling
    • T3 L3 – Public Information Programs for DSM
    • T3 L4 – DSM strategies adopted in each country
    • T3 L5 – Appropriateness of DSM given regional context
  4. Social and economic aspects of DSM
    • T4 L1 – Social and economic aspects of DSM and identification of key variables
    • T4 L2 – Examples of Life-cycle cost analysis

Course Details:

This course aims at providing the students with information about the use of thermal energy storage technologies in large-scale and industrial applications. The course begins with an introductory overview of examples of the integration of thermal energy storage in production and energy facilities, specifically in energy-intensive industries, concentrating solar power, and district heating and cooling. The students will be introduced to recent research progress in terms of innovative materials, container designs and concepts for systems integration for large-scale TES. Specific demonstration and operational, real-world projects as well as collection and analysis of in-field performance data will be discussed in detail. Different numeric simulation exercises give an introduction to the computer aided TES design and integration using realistic scenarios. The course will delve into environmental and economic aspects of large-scale TES installations, specifically introducing the use of LCA, LCC and further analyses in these studies, and will close with several real-world examples of applications in large-scale thermal energy storage. Common issues with industrial installations will be presented, including the scalability of R&D results.

Topics:

  1. Integration of TES in facilities
    • L1 – TES in energy intensive industry
    • L2 – TES in CSP
    • L3* – Overview of thermal energy storage systems for district heating and cooling
  2. Recent research progress and promising scientific directions
    • T2 L1* – Introduction to materials selection methodology and case studies
    • T2 L2 – Recent development for large-scale TES and case studies
  3. Experimental demonstration and field performance of TES in large-scale applications
    • T3 L1 – Research at pilot plant scale/demo scale. Case studies
  4. Simulation of TES in large-scale applications
    • T4 L1 – Application of numerical simulation tools to analyze thermal energy storage systems in large-scale applications. Case studies
  5. Environmental and economic aspects
    • T5 L1* – Introduction to LCA, LCC, cost-base analysis and carbon footprint: methodology, boundary selection, input data. Outputs of a LCA and LCC analysis, environmental and economic interpretation
    • T5 L2 – LCA applied to large-scale TES sub-unit. Case studies

Course Details:

The energy policy and market development course takes a holistic approach in looking at how thermal energy storage can solve issues identified at EU policy level. It commences by providing insights into energy policy with particular reference to renewable energy policies, and examines this further by considering "good" and "poor" policies. Then in a heuristic fashion, it looks at the theory and real-life examples of how market development tools can be used to identify and develop new opportunities for TES in the context of energy efficiency and renewable energy technology policies. The course also examines how best to inform policy through key skills such as networking, influencing and communication, and how this can be enabled by being close to the customer and aware of predicted future market developments.

Topics:

  1. Energy policy insight
    • T1 L1* – Renewable energy policies
    • T1 L2 – Understanding the regulatory constraints and their boundary conditions. Examining existing or proposed energy policy critically; find unintended consequences of implementation and understanding ‘good’ versus ‘poor’ policy decisions.
  2. Market development tools
    • T2 L1* – Business analysis tools
    • T2 L2 – Energy efficiency and renewable energy technology context and implication for TES. Identification of the drivers of energy policy
  3. Informing policy
    • T3 L1* – Networking and influencing the policy-makers
    • T3 L2* – Dissemination, exploitation and communication plan